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Camp Leroo LeTau in Botswana

This camp (which was my boyfriend’s favourite camp) was set on the banks of the Boteti River with the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park on the other side of the river.  There weren’t as many guests staying at this camp so we got to know our guides and the managers very well and learned about local life, the animals and their thoughts on various topics like politics, soccer and TV shows (one of the managers watches Grand Design!).

Highlights from this camp included:

  • Hippos! We took a speed boat to get from the accommodation on one side of the river to the national park on the other side of the river where we did our game drives.  On the way, we would see the hippos move from the banks of the river into the water.

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  • Lions hunting in the sunset.  We watched a pride of lions hunting for zebra.  The lioness sat right in front of our jeep for a while.  It was late afternoon and time for our ‘sundowner’, so Lasty (our guide) gave us our drinks and nibbles (including a meaty bacon roll!) with the lioness sitting right in front of the jeep.

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The next day we saw the grandpa of the pride slowly following the rest of his family members.  He was slow with weak muscles and a greying beard.

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  • Zebras! Literally a zebra crossing… The zebras were migrating and passing through the park.  There would have to be have been hundreds of zebras in the area.

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  • The view from our room.  We were starting to get very tired from all the travel by this leg of the trip.  We were waking up at 6am for game drives or heading to different camps on light aircrafts and then heading for a game drive soon after we landed.  The change in environment and the jet lag was starting to wear us down.  So we decided to take an afternoon off to sit on our balcony and read.  But we hardly got any reading done because we noticed a pod of hippos sleeping on one corner, and then hundred of zebras walking in lines to get to the watering hole.  It was fascinating to watch them all arrive, stop and then run down in groups to the water, drink and bathe, and then leave so that the others could also have a turn.  There were also groups of wildebeest that came with the zebras – they have a ‘symbiotic relationship’ which means they rely on each other for safety.  Wildebeest have poor eyesight but have good hearing, while zebras can see well but have poor hearing.

This was our room…

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And the view…

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  • Elephants. This is a boys club only who were far less threatening than the elephants at Savute.  In fact, most of the animals seemed calmer than those at Savute as they have access to so much more water.

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  • Visiting the school at Khumaga Village. On our last day, we visited the village – which one of the guides happened to grow up in – which was also a great experience.  We visited the local school and learned about the classes and how the school is run by the principal and a group of teachers.  Next, we visited the kindergarten class where all the kids lined up and sang a few songs for us! They gave us high fives afterwards and one sweet little boy even gave me a hug.  We left, but came back with their morning tea which our guide really wanted to give them.  They took their little bags of snacks with open arms and gave us high fives again! It was SO CUTE and probably the highlight of the trip for me.  We didn’t get any photos as we weren’t allowed to take photos of the children or the school.  But if you ever get a chance to go to this camp, I highly recommend asking your guides to take you here.

Maadz xox

1 Comment so far

  1. Sha

    You literally had a live zebra crossing in front of you…hahaha! Wasn’t it scary since it was an open vehicle? I’ve always wondered about that…haha

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